Copperhead Snake Bites.

Fuoss Mills mother of five struck. August 1953

The afternoon heat was building as Jeanne and her eleven year old daughter walked to the flower garden. Ten strands of white string hooked below the gutter, the other end attached to stakes in the ground, running the length of the side of the house. Beautiful Morning Glories of lavender, white, and red grew around the cords half way to the roof. Peggy watched as her mom bent down and wrapped her fingers around a weed. “Ouch.” Her index finger stinging as she pulled her hand back. At first she thought she had been stung by a bee, but when she parted the flowers, fear flashed through her body, the snake lay coiled, ready too strike again. She jerked her daughter back onto the porch, opened the kitchen door and pushed her in. “Don’t let any of the other children outside.” She slammed the door, ran across the porch crying and yelling, “stay in the house kids don’t come out.” She continued running to the next door neighbor who took her to the hospital.

Before she arrived at the emergency room her arm had swollen to her elbow. They did not have the anti-venom on hand and had to send to another hospital to get it.

Her husband was called home from work. As he walked to the side of the house the snake came slithering out of the flower bed. He had a shovel in hand and killed it. Turning he ripped the flowers down, carried them to the trash barrel and stuffed them in. After a week in the hospital his wife recovered and went home.

She was the second victim of a poisonous reptile reported in the Tyrone area in five days. The newspapers speculate the state had sprayed the power lines on the mountain and the snakes were coming down for water. Jeanne’s house lay between the power lines and the river.

The next year she strung the white lines and planted her Morning Glories. But this time she checked carefully before weeding the garden.

Thank you for Traveling with Me.

 

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